Intimidating dictionary meaning

Copyright © 2016, 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. THE AMERICAN HERITAGE® DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, FIFTH EDITION by the Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries.

The Norwegian researcher Dan Olweus says bullying occurs when a person is "exposed, repeatedly and over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more other persons", In a 2012 study of male adolescent American football players, "the strongest predictor [of bullying] was the perception of whether the most influential male in a player's life would approve of the bullying behavior." Behaviors used to assert such domination may include physical assault or coercion, verbal harassment, or threat, and such acts may be directed repeatedly toward particular targets.

Rationalizations of such behavior sometimes include differences of social class, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, appearance, behavior, body language, personality, reputation, lineage, strength, size, or ability.

The word "bully" was first used in the 1530s meaning "sweetheart", applied to either sex, from the Dutch boel "lover, brother", probably diminutive of Middle High German buole "brother", of uncertain origin (compare with the German buhle "lover").

The meaning deteriorated through the 17th century through "fine fellow", "blusterer", to "harasser of the weak".

Bullying ranges from one-on-one, individual bullying through to group bullying, called mobbing, in which the bully may have one or more "lieutenants" who may be willing to assist the primary bully in their bullying activities.

Bullying in school and the workplace is also referred to as "peer abuse". Fuller has analyzed bullying in the context of rankism.

Physical, verbal, and relational bullying are most prevalent in primary school and could also begin much earlier whilst continuing into later stages in individuals lives."To frighten" or "make fearful" is at the root of the verb intimidate.An animal might intimidate a smaller animal by bearing its teeth, and a person can intimidate another by threatening to do something harmful.This is the British English definition of intimidate. Change your default dictionary to American English. You can see "timid" in the middle of intimidate, and to be timid is to be frightened or to pull back from something.

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  1. “While men can procreate throughout their lives, dating a younger woman (especially quite a bit younger) lengthens the ‘window’ for being able to have children.